Jones family of Masterton – journeys

This past weekend I went to a family reunion of the Jones family (my mother’s surname) – it was the 175th anniversary of their arrival in New Zealand aboard the ship ‘London’ – leaving England on 1 January 1842 and arriving in Wellington on 1 May 1842 – with no stops along the way. Perhaps I should have called this post ‘keeping up with the Joneses’!

I have already written something about this family here. And about my mother who grew up on the Jones family farm in Masterton and helped with the family milk delivery business at times.

Apart from meeting up with first, second and third cousins – most of the latter two groups I hadn’t met before – I also found interesting photos and memorabilia. This, for example, in an album belonging to one of my cousins, Keith Jones, (with a detail)

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Forgotten Memorials

DSC01711I’m going to lead a ‘Secret art walk’ of Wellington for a group in a few weeks’ time. “Secret Art Walk” was the subject of a brochure issued in 2012 – an initiative of “the Property Council of New Zealand proudly sponsored by Beca”. It was updated a year or two later but is – I think – now considered ‘out of print’ or out of date as it isn’t available at the Wellington info centre. It is mainly about art works located in the foyers of commercial buildings – some in the brochure can no longer be seen, but I have found others too that aren’t in the brochure. Quite a number are labelled, but also quite a number aren’t. As I was doing research for this walk, I came across a website of Stephen Gibbs who did the walk in 2015 and blogged about it over a couple of months. You can download a copy of the original brochure here (PDF): Secret Art Walk Continue reading

Otorohanga: Kiwiana town

kiwiana town Otorohanga

Recently we stayed a couple of nights in Otorohanga (in the Waikato district, sort of middle-north in the North Island). As we travel about in various places (New Zealand, Australia, America come to mind) we like to see what towns and cities call themselves. I don’t mean their actual names, I mean the little epithets they give themselves (is epithet the right word?: “an adjective or phrase expressing a quality or attribute regarded as characteristic of the person or thing mentioned”). Perhaps they are just slogans thought up by someone on the local council or tourism board!

Wellington, where I live, is sometimes called Wellywood, a pastiche of Hollywood in homage to the Sir Peter Jackson-led film industry we have here. More often it’s called Windy Wellington, but that isn’t a positive image for tourism so the label “absolutely positively Wellington” was invented. You want positive? Absolutely! Actually, I see it wasn’t meant to be anything big, but caught the imagination and stuck. (click the link to see its origins.)

The silliest one I think I ever saw was “Foxton, the Fox Town”. Continue reading

Riding the rails to Whangamomona

20170227_141113Last week we did a day trip with Forgotten World Adventures using golf carts converted to run on the disused rail line from Okahukura (near Taumaranui in the North Island of New Zealand) to Whangamomona.

This rail line was closed in 2010; which seems a shame as it took more than 30 years to build in the early 20th century and includes 24 tunnels and 91 bridges. However, Ian Balme saw an opportunity and negotiated a lease with KiwiRail and started the business in 2012. There are high maintenance costs – especially clearing the line after each winter, which helps explain why the rides aren’t particularly cheap. But with lunch and morning and afternoon teas provided and a return ride, we thought it was worth it. Continue reading

Chain migration

Since setting up this website I have received a few queries mainly relating to family history (this is in addition to comments on specific posts). A recent one led me to do some more research on one of my great-grandmothers who came to New Zealand in 1880. The query was:

“Hello, I have just read an article on line about my great uncle Stanley Austwick who died on the Somme in 1916. It mentions that a relative was Mrs S Morrell of Miramar. Are you related to this person? I ask because my mother says Stanley was engaged to a girl in New Zealand. We would love to know who she was and what happened to her.”

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Travels in Communist Europe – 1981

visa-berlinNow it is relatively common for New Zealand school children to take school trips to other countries, but when I was young it wasn’t at all common. It was too expensive – and perhaps it just wasn’t considered something worthwhile. I grew up in the North Island inland town of Masterton and had one school trip to Nelson in the South Island, and hockey team trips to New Plymouth and Napier.

My first overseas trip was when I was 18 or 19 and it was to Melbourne and parts of Victoria (Australia) with the under-23 Wellington women’s hockey team. We came last in the hockey tournament, but I enjoyed the travel. The next year a friend and I went to Tonga (briefly) and Fiji for a holiday and about 16 months later I did my ‘big OE’ (“overseas experience” – almost a rite of passage for young New Zealanders). I was in the UK and Europe for eight months, based in London when I wasn’t travelling, which I was most of the time. Continue reading

Hogarth’s ‘Marriage a la mode’

In my part-time job at Te Papa I sometimes get to spend hours with some of the national art collection. The visitor host art floor supervisor asked some of us to write a paragraph for a joint blog post about which art work currently on display we would like for Christmas (if we could have one, which of course we can’t!)

There is so much to choose from it was difficult, but this is my contribution. You can read the full post here.

“All I want for Christmas is William Hogarth’s Marriage a la mode print series, because it would give hours of pleasure deciphering all the details. Continue reading